Archive: September 2012 -

Fiction: Better View into Human Nature than Non-fiction?

My mom and I were debating this the other day.  I think fiction does a better job describing human nature and all its complications than non-fiction.  That's because I think when authors write fiction, they can be more anonymous.  They can make their characters do anything they've ever seen or imagined in the realm of human nature. They can even make their characters be versions of themselves.  The characters can then do things the author has always thought about or wanted to do.  However, when someone is writing non-fiction, they have to stick to describing real people.  They can't make...

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Killing off Characters: How to do it fast

I took my own advice from my last blog to go ahead and kill off one of ELECTED's characters.  I thought about it for awhile first because you don't want to kill someone off who will be a major plot piece of a subsequent book.  But after careful consideration, I felt like one of my periphery characters was just fluff.  He did show up in the plot outline for book 2, NEGLECTED, but I sliced him out of there too! Here's how I did it fast.  The FIND button in Microsoft Word!  There were about twenty different times during the ELECTED book that this one character's name, Cole, popped up.  I searched,...

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The Backpack-Really Cool Advice from Veronica Roth

I love looking at Veronica Roth's website full of blog posts.  She's the author of the dystopia YA novel, Divergent.  Even the way she writes blogs, you can hear her unique voice.  And I specifically liked this one post about a writer's "backpack", so I'm copying the link to it here: http://veronicarothbooks.blogspot.com/2010/01/things-ive-learned-backpack.html It's some advice on what to include (and not to include) in a novel.  And since I'm in the editing stage of a couple of my latest books, I appreciate this advice.  One example she gave on what not to include:  "If there's a gun in a scene...

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National Book Festival 2012

THIS is why I like Washington DC!  Because it has free events like this on the National Mall.  This weekend is the 2012 National Book Festival, with a ton of authors, signing books and talking to the public.  And they have storytelling for kids. Here's the link.  http://www.loc.gov/bookfest/authors/2012 There will be some pretty famous authors there, like Charlaine Harris, the woman who wrote the Sookie Stackhouse books behind the HBO show True Blood.  And R.L. Stine will be there.  Do you remember him?  He wrote all those addicting horror books for teens.  I must have financed...

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Literary Rambles!

I was the featured guest blogger today on Literary Rambles, a website dedicated to the craft of writing.  Check it out! www.literaryrambles.com My blog posting (tip #143) was all about finding time to write while balancing the rest of life.  I got some really interesting comments in returns.  One person talked about keeping a voice activated recorder in her car, so that when she thought of a good writing idea or some lines of text, she could just start saying them into the recorder.  Then some software automatically changed the voice recording to text and sent it to her computer.  Pretty...

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Word Count Statistics – What’s in a Word?

I was doing some research on the internet about average word count for different types of books.  Here's what I found from author, Cassandra Marshall: Average Word Counts Micro-Fiction - up to 100 words Flash Fiction - 100 - 1,000 words, usually no more than 500. Short Story - 1,000 - 7,500 words Novellette - 7,500 - 18,000 words Novella -20,000 - 45,000 words General Novel - 50,000 -110,000 Genre Guidelines Picture Books -200-500 words Early Readers - 500-2000 words Chapter Books - 5,000-10,000 words Middle Grade - 25,000-45,000 words, most averaging 35k. Young adult...

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Check out this article on self-publishing from CNN

I'm copying the entirety on this article from CNN.  What do you think? 27 of top 100 Kindle books are self-published It's been called a "cure for rejection-letter fatigue." Amazon on Thursday released new details about the success of its program for authors who want to self-publish on its Kindle e-reader devices. The company, which unveiled a suite of new e-readers and tablets at a press conference in Southern California on Thursday, says 27 of the top 100 Kindle books were created using a system called Kindle Direct Publishing. That system allows authors to bypass traditional publishers...

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Would You Pay for a Critique?

Continuing on my theme of critiques after my last post about having a writer's critique circle, I'll tell you something fascinating I saw today.  Irene Goodman, a literary agent, puts a post on Ebay the first Friday of every month to do critiques on the first thirty pages of a manuscript.  She says on her website that she's even picked up an author client from reading their pages through this critique.  So you bid on this critique, and if you win then she or another agent in her group will critique your pages within a month. So I thought, why not?  I'll bid on that.  The proceeds go to charity. ...

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© 2012 through the United States Library of Congress.